The Calvary Road

51okwpajzhl-_sx319_bo1204203200_A short, simple, but powerful book, “The Calvary Road” is an amazing manual about practical Christianity. If followed, the principles in this book will perpetually change your life by helping you receive more of God than ever before by consistently surrendering to Him than ever before. One of the best books on grace every written, “The Calvary Road” has changed many lives for the better over the years. The themes of humility, confession, and brokenness, as discussed so well by Hession, are important to any Christian. Every Christian should have this in their library. It teaches about how much the Lord really does want to help us, and most importantly how much He really does want to be with us on an individual level.

17 thoughts on “The Calvary Road

  1. The Calvary Road by Roy Hession is a really wonderful book. I picked it up because of the Koinonia Winter Break Bingo Challenge, and I’m really glad that I read it. It’s a book that allowed me to experience the beauty of the Cross all over again. And personally, it was a book that brought a lot of convictions. The Calvary Road also gave me many practical challenges to grow in my relationship with God as well as my Christian life. I really recommend this book! 🙂

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  2. This is my 4th time reading The Calvary Road and each time it opens my eyes to the greater reality of my sinfulness and the desire that God has for me to come to HIm in complete truth. This book helps me dig deeper into parts of my heart that I can easily ignore. It is a must read

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  3. Hession opened up my eyes to sins that are frequently and easily ignored–particularly during his discussion on how we like to point fingers and say “It’s your fault!” while failing to acknowledge a victim’s unloving reaction also as a sin. I also saw how much I fall short of imitating Christ because even as Jesus was being led to the cross, there was nothing in his heart but love for his persecutors. Even as Jesus was being nailed to the cross, he was forgiving his persecutors and asking the Father to forgive them as well. As I was reminded of Jesus’ humility and love for us, I was convicted of my own sins and was shown how I can better imitate Christ.

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  4. I found The Calvary Road to be a thought-provoking, timeless book. Hession’s points about sin, repentance, and the redemption of Calvary are simple, bare truths. I see why so many recommend this book; it’s been helpful to my personal reflection as well as a guide for how to live a life of continuous revival in Jesus!

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  5. This is my second time reading this book and I was hit afresh about how easily I slip off the Calvary road but through confession and repentance, I can get back on the narrow path. Through this book I saw that personal revival is something I can daily experience, not just a sweeping movement of the Holy Spirit that leaves as quickly as it came. Among the many memorable illustrations Hession uses to make his points, one contrasting picture that I like to remember is how our sinful reactions are like a vicious snake poised to strike versus a humble worm that resists no one. Christ was like that worm that offered no push back, but received all the punishment in order to save us from our sins. I highly recommend this book!

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  6. While reading the book, it convicted me to come to the cross with constant confession and repentance that can lead to revival and power in your life. I especially enjoyed the part where he talks about how we need to be bondservants because it reminded me of how much I constantly feel entitled in anything that I do. Overall, the book really encouraged me to grow in my relationship with God by being broken and then being mended through the blood of Jesus Christ on the cross 🙂

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  7. This book, like his other book We Would See Jesus, is a great read no matter where you are in your faith. It clearly covers aspects of repentance and relating to God that are crucial for your spiritual life. Great read if you want to go back to the core truths of the gospel and be refreshed in your faith!

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  8. The Calvary Road was challenging from the very start: to be broken, in essence, is to say, “Not I, but Christ.” And C is just a bent I. I was particularly struck by his point on the fact that our fellowship with others is a reflection of our fellowship with God. We’re often asserting our rights, or quick to point out a mote in someone’s eye, and yet we have a beam in our own; when we insist on self in our relationships with people, we fall out of fellowship with God. Always, Hession beckons us to look at Calvary, to look at the Lamb of God, who was reviled and did not revile, who was the shorn Lamb, the silent Lamb, the spotless Lamb. And at the face of such humility, the only proper response is repentance, which leads to the revival that he talks about in the book. I can’t speak of how valuable this book is, only to say, go read it!

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  9. Calvary Road is a very concise yet powerful and straightforward book. It challenged me, particularly in terms of my state of brokenness before Christ and how that leads to further relationships with Christ-followers. The insight to how much my devotion and relationships with those around me reflect that of with God. The most impactful message of the book was that it is necessary for me to constantly bring my life to death, thus allowing characters of humility, brokenness, transparency, repentance, surrender, and trust to fully enter my life so that I receive peace, fellowship, and victory through the Blood of Christ.

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  10. This is my second time reading this book and it hit me again in different ways. Overall, the book drove home the need to constantly come to Jesus to see our sins and to be broken in order to have peace with God. The most impactful chapter to me was Chapter 5: The Dove and the Lamb where it discussed how the peace of God can escape us because of we are unwilling to be certain aspects of the Lamb.

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  11. Like the others above have mentioned, this book gets straight to the point and outlines how the gospel should affect our daily lives. The book provides several moments for readers to pause and reflect, and ultimate evaluate their daily lives in light of the many truths presented in the book. During this read through, I was challenged to reflect over how much am I allowing the peace of Christ to enter and impact my life, in addition to reflecting to see how much do I viscerally understand my brokenness and if I truly live out a life as a servant.

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  12. First time reading “Cavalry Road”! One theme that stood out from the entire book is the necessity of personal brokenness before spiritual revival: realizing that we are broken, we can be filled with Christ. Chapter 10: Protesting of Innocence looked at the story of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector (or Publican in the book). While the Pharisee makes God into a liar by trying to prove his own righteousness, the Publican knows that sin separates him from God and justifies God by confessing his sin.

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  13. This was my first time reading this book. I appreciated how it can easily be read in one sitting although it takes longer to really absorb the material. Through this book, I was struck once again by my sinfulness. From the very beginning of the book, it establishes the fact that it is our self that gets in the way of a relationship with Jesus. By the end, we are left with the image of the Publican who kneels before God, no bit of self left in him.

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  14. Like others have said, the book was very poignant for its length and I wish I could do it more justice! I was struck by the simplicity of living a renewed life with God, and how although its simple, it starts with something that’s hard to do. A lot of the book focused on brokenness, and I questioned myself whether I really knew what it was like to experience brokenness and emptying of self, becoming that worm, becoming nothing and possessing nothing. This is the opposite of something I’ve tried to do my whole life, which was assert myself and try to make myself more, but becoming nothing and thinking of myself as nothing is the beginning of being a servant and being able to bring my cup to Jesus to clean and fill.

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  15. Overall this was a quick read with some pretty dense material that was to-the-point about what Christian life should look like. At times I felt silly for having to remind myself of the central truths of the gospel yet again. But maybe the fact that I forget just proves the point — that my default really is against God. One overarching theme that struck me was that the Highway of Holiness really consists in just the day to day. There’s no emotional experience to sigh after, just a willingness to bend our necks as Hession says for God to reveal sin our lives so we can experience Revival in our own lives. God doesn’t call me to measure my sins by the intensity of my emotions towards them, but by a simple look at the cross.

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  16. The metaphor of the Calvary Road gave a fresh perspective on Christian life and what it looks like to repent and come back to the cross in order to get back on the road. My favorite quote is: “Beloved, if we feel we are innocent and have nothing to be broken about, it is not that these things are not there, but that we have not seen them.” Sometimes it certainly feels like my sinfulness is not present, but over time, I’ve lived to see this quote to be true, and it gives me a sobering realization that when I do feel as if there’s nothing wrong with me at the moment, then it is only a matter of time that the reality is going to hit that I’m wrong about myself.

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  17. The Calvary Road really showed me what revival meant. It reminded me that I constantly need to go to the cross with my sins, with a humble heart knowing that I am a bondservant of Christ. That I have no appreciation that I deserve for my efforts for God and that I am no use to God, even though I often seek to prove to be someone that can be used by God. The quote that resonated with me was: “the admission that doing and bearing what we have in the way of meekness and humility, we have not done one stitch more than it was our duty to do.”

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